Saudi Bombing of Funeral Gathering a War Crime — UN Panel

Fire and smoke rise after a Saudi-led airstrike hit a site believed to be a large weapons depot on the outskirts of Yemen's capital Sanaa on Oct. 14 2016

Iran Shipping Weapons to Oman for Transfer to Yemen

The Saudi Arabia-led coalition operating in Yemen began bombing targets in the country's capital Sanaa on Sunday morning, hours after a three-day truce expired, residents said.

Pleas to extend it by another 72 hours from the UN's special envoy to Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, appear to have failed as hostilities resumed.

The intensity of air raids by the Saudi-led coalition had eased during the 72-hour ceasefire that ended at midnight (2100 GMT) Saturday.

The previous 72-hour truce expired at 11:59 p.m. local time Saturday.

"Despite reported violations from all parties since the truce took effect midnight last Wednesday, relief aid reached the affected areas and United Nations employees were able to move better in those areas which previously were inaccessible", Ould Cheikh said in a press release hours after the truce expired. "We would like to build on this and we aim for a wider outreach in the next few days", Ahmed added.

Parents also fear that they will get financially overwhelmed by the youngsters' needs.

The Houthi-controlled Sabanews agency, however, did claim that rebel fighters and allied Yemeni troops had seized a Saudi border post and repelled an attack inside Saudi territory. "The [Houthi] coup militias deliberately thwarted the truce and that further convinced our military and political leadership of their unwillingness to accept peace", Yemen's army chief of staff Mohammed Ali al-Miqdashi told reporters.

Ahmar said government forces were "exercising restraint" and stressed that there were orders to "abide by the truce and respect United Nations efforts".

A senior rebel, Hassan al-Sharafi, was killed in border clashes Friday night in the northern province of Saada, the fiefdom of the Iran-backed Houthis, military officials said.

Almost 7,000 people have died since early past year, when Saudi Arabia formed a coalition to prevent Iran-backed Shiite Houthi rebels from deposing President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi and taking over the country.

The ceasefire came into effect ten days after the Saudi-led coalition backing Hadi bombed a funeral hall in Sana'a, killing some 140 people including prominent public figures.

Air strikes were reported over some military sites in Sanaa in the Hafa camp to the east and in the Nahdein area in the South.

What is more unsafe, according to Ghallab, is that insurgents consider the war a means to pressure the Arab coalition.

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