Arizona Supreme Court to rule on same-sex parental rights

Supreme Court to Hear Case of Baker Who Refused to Make Wedding Cake for Gay Couple

Supreme Court will hear Colorado gay wedding cake case

According to USA Today, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear an ongoing sports betting case from the New Jersey courts that has always been a magnet for political grandstanding.

Supreme Court justices voted Monday to hear the appeal from the owner of a Colorado bakery.

"The law says you can't discriminate against people in a certain number of categories - including sexual orientation and gender identity", said Arash Jahanian of the ACLU. Two of the three couples asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review the decision.

Charlie Craig and David Mullins say they were deeply hurt when Phillips refused their request for a cake to mark their wedding in 2012.

The US Supreme Court's action came after Republican President Donald Trump's appointee Neil Gorsuch joined the court on April 10, restoring its 5-4 conservative majority.

'Masterpiece remains free to continue espousing its religious beliefs, including its opposition to same-sex marriage, ' the court ruled. The couple planned to marry in MA and wanted a cake to celebrate in Colorado.

The couple, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, won at the Colorado Court of Appeals and the Colorado Civil Rights Commission.

The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a Second Amendment case that some believe presents the "single most important unresolved Second Amendment question", whether it secures an individual's right to bear arms for self-defense outside the home.

The other was Ahilan Nadarajah, a Sri Lankan who sought asylum in the United States in 2001 but ended up in detention for four years and five months due to secret evidence claiming he was a Tamil separatist fighter. Only those who can prove they have a regular need for self-defense against a specific threat are granted concealed permits.

The justices, as is custom, gave no reason for agreeing to hear the appeal of a court decision that threw out the state's latest effort to bring sports betting to its casinos and race tracks.

Arkansas Supreme Court Associate Judge Jo Hart argued in favor of the same-sex omission in December 2016, "In the situation involving the female spouse of a biological mother, the female spouse does not have the same biological nexus to the child that the biological mother or the biological father has".

This is one of several similar cases across the country. Attorney General Leslie Rutledge, a Republican, said she disagreed with the court's ruling.

"I think I would have made the cake", said Jason Richardson of Lakewood.

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