BC NDP government hires legal advice for Kinder Morgan challenges

NDP government won't permit Kinder Morgan to put shovels in ground on public land for pipeline

BC government seeks intervener status on Trans Mountain expansion

The B.C. government is seeking intervenor status in a legal challenge to stop the $7.4-billion Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project.

The Province will also fulfil its duty of meaningful consultation with Indigenous people concerning this project, including consultations regarding potential impacts to Aboriginal rights and title - a responsibility that has been identified in a number of court cases.

"This project, which was approved by the Trudeau government after lengthy review, would create thousands of jobs across British Columbia", Coleman said in a statement.

Kinder Morgan recently announced it would begin construction on portions of the pipeline in September.

"Some of the tools that were available to BC previously were given away by the previous government when they agreed to accept the National Energy Board review as its own review".

As well, the Squamish First Nation has a court challenge related to inadequate consultation by Kinder Morgan on its project, which proposes to nearly triple the number of barrels of oil shipped per day from Edmonton to the shores of Burrard Inlet, increasing from 300,000 to 890,000. Hyman said eight permits have been issued but they can't be acted on until the company meets the requirements of the environmental assessment certificate issued by the previous government. The NDP said without the certificates, the Trans Mountain expansion can not move forward on public land.

"We will use every tool available to defend BC's Coast in the face of this threat and we will continue to explore every tool possible to hold Kinder Morgan's project proposal and plans to the highest standards of environmental protection and Indigenous consultation".

Eby explained there are two court actions underway with regards to the Kinder Morgan pipeline proposal. It was supported by British Columbia's former BC Liberal premier, Christy Clark who was ousted in June by NDP Leader John Horgan. "British Columbians should be rightly concerned that their government is spending tax dollars to stop a project that will not only boost our local economies but also benefit the rest of our country".

The other challenge is by the Squamish First Nation, which has filed a lawsuit against the province in B.C. Supreme Court for issuing an environmental certificate for the pipeline expansion.

"Until those plans are completed, Kinder Morgan, with the exception of private land. can not put shovels in the ground", the minister said.

Notley said she was pleased that in Thursday's announcement, the government moved away from discussing halting the pipeline and shifted to making sure environmental and First Nations concerns are met. Kinder Morgan Canada's stock price fell 3.6% in trading on Toronto stock market, closing the session at C$17.28. Meanwhile the City of Burnaby even took Kinder Morgan to court over the proposal, to no avail.

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