Perseid meteor shower to light up the skies tonight into Sunday

Chong with the stargazers at the Lim Choon Kiat Observatory

Chong with the stargazers at the Lim Choon Kiat Observatory

This year, the meteors peaked on Saturday August 12, although the spactacle has been most prominent all weekend.

The Perseid meteor shower had its peak time on Saturday night.

It's back! The Perseid Meteor Shower will be happening across the North American skies tonight, and while there's a chance everyone will be able to see it, we still have a few problems preventing a full viewing!

The annual shower takes placed every July and August as the Earth passes debris from the Swift-Tuttle comet.

Interpretive Park Ranger Breanna Corp at Whiskeytown National Recreation Center said this is one of the biggest meteor showers of the year. The upcoming total solar eclipse on August 21 has seen hundreds of thousands of people make arrangements to get the best possible view of the phenomenon - the first of its kind since 1979.

"This year the moon will drown out the faint stars so instead of seeing one or two shooting stars every minute, you might only see half of this".

The name Perseid is from the Perseus constellation, which is the area from which they appear to travel from in the sky.

Around 80 each hour came speeding down at 36 miles per second, a dream for photographers as much of the country had clear skies. "The moonlight can create a haze and reduce the number of shooting stars you see".

The Swift-Tuttle comet orbits the sun every 135 years but at nearly 90 degrees to the orbit of the Earth.

It's said to be happening over the next two nights also so have a look and enjoy!

NASA's meteor expert, Bill Cooke, says the Perseids "can be the warm-up act".

"The Perseids can be very bright and often quite spectacular", said Mr Scagell.

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