Trump's 'fire and fury' broadside his own, White House says

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson

So while Trump may have said before he took office that the USA has to "strengthen and expand its nuclear capability", not much has truly happened on that front just yet, no matter what you read on Twitter.

Speaking in New Jersey at his golf course, Trump declined to rule out a preemptive strike on North Korea, saying he wouldn't discuss potential military options. I just wonder when President Trump will try and claim that he too doesn't need to use a toilet or that his hair is the envy of every man, woman and child on the planet. It is now far stronger and more powerful than ever before.

North Korea regularly threatens to destroy the United States. "We don't have a bigger or more powerful nuclear arsenal today", Harrison said.

Following President Donald Trump's remarks that further threats from Pyongyang would be met with "fire and fury", Tillerson said Americans should not be concerned by the heated rhetoric coming from both sides. While it's unclear what Trump might have first said to associates in private just after taking office, his first concrete actions did not address the United States's nuclear arsenal.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was on his way back from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Wednesday morning when his plane stopped off in Guam to refuel. One said "Trump vows US "power" will meet North Korean threat". "The only time our posture goes up is based on facts, not because of what Kim and Trump say to each other", the official added.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says he doesn't believe there is "any imminent threat" from North Korea, including to the USA territory of Guam. About a third of United States air force planes were not in conditions to operate in any mission and the nuclear arsenal remains of the past lacking modernization. Ben Cardin, the Foreign affairs committee's top Democrat, compared Trump's comments to those issued by North Korea itself.

Gorka's statements come amid confusion about the administration's policy toward North Korea after a series of statements that have been dramatically different in tone and have sent starkly different messages.

Sebastian Gorka, deputy assistant to the president, made the comments to the BBC amid reports of division within the Trump administration on how to handle North Korea.

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