European Union stops natural gas sales to North Korea

Military Says Has Technology to Make Blackout Bombs

North Korea hackers steal South Korea war plans

The White House said Trump met with members of his national security team on Tuesday to discuss the growing threat from the North.

While North Korea was not able to hack USA power companies, there are concerns among some of observers that the regime may attempt to damage the power grid by detonating a nuclear device at a high altitude above the US, triggering an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

The information, that included wartime contingency plans drawn up by the US and South Korea, was from the country's defence ministry, according to Rhee Cheol-hee, a South Korean lawmaker.

The two B-1B bombers were accompanied by two F-15K fighters from the South Korean military after leaving their base in Guam, the South's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a news release on Wednesday.

An unusually aggressive approach to the North by Trump, which has included rhetoric hinting at US strikes and threatening the destruction of North Korea's leadership, has some South Koreans fearful that war is closer than at any time since the Korean War ended in 1953 in a shaky cease-fire, leaving the Korean Peninsula still technically in a state of war.

"If I had access to the enemy's plans, not only would I know what forces were going to be arrayed against me, I would know where they will be, what weapons they will have, where the command and control nodes will be established - all critical war-fighting information". Defense officials refused to comment when reached by other media.

Late last month, the Air Force sent two B-1Bs over worldwide waters close to the North's east coast.

Reports of reconnaissance on United States utilities follow earlier reports alleging DPRK spies stole a large cache of military documents from South Korea, including a plan to assassinate North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un. Kim is the third generation of his family to rule North Korea.

President Trump hosted a discussion on options to respond to any North Korean aggression, or, if necessary, to prevent Pyongyang from threatening the United States and its allies with nuclear weapons, the White House said in a statement.

Lee said that 235 gigabytes of military documents were taken, but the military has yet to identify 80 percent of the documents that were compromised.

It was part of a "regular deployment training" aimed at enhancing the capability of implementing the "extended deterrence" against the North, the JCS said. North Korea routinely denies responsibility.

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