Jones Act: What is it?

Land destroyed by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico

Land destroyed by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico

US President Donald Trump has taken to Twitter to lash out at the mayor of Puerto Rico's capital city and other officials, contemptuous of their claims of a slow response to the natural disaster that has imperilled the island's future.

She then appeared in a T-shirt that said "Help us, we're dying" for a CNN television interview. John McCain, R-Ariz., to introduce legislation Thursday to exempt Puerto Rico from a federal shipping law to help Hurricane Maria recovery efforts. "10,000 Federal workers now on Island doing a fantastic job", he continued in a series of tweets.

Cruz on Friday also bristled at suggestions that the relief effort had been well-coordinated.

The mayor retorted: "This is, damn it, this is not a good news story".

"The electric power grid in Puerto Rico is totally shot". Sadie Gray says she is getting by but there is nothing much left of the island she now calls home.

Around the same time that Trump was on Twitter, Cruz tweeted thanks to the politicians who had seen what San Juan needed first hand. "We want to do it through organizations to make if more orderly and more effective".

Wilson Hernandez and his family rebuild their house destroyed by Hurricane Maria in the neigborhood of Acerolas in Toa Alto, Puerto Rico, on September 26, 2017.

"You're going straight to hell", tweeted Lin-Manuel Miranda.

This spat with the San Juan mayor won't be preventing the president from traveling to Puerto Rico with First Lady Melania Trump on Tuesday to survey the damage. I'm standing in my back yard right now because that is where I get a really good cell signal and I'm looking at what used to be a forest and it just naked, broken bad trees.

The US government declared its relief efforts in Puerto Rico were succeeding but people on the hurricane-devastated island said help was scarce and many residents were desperate for fresh water, food and electricity.

At least 16 people died and almost all its people were left without power and most without water. This is, "there's a truckload of stuff that can not be taken to people" story. It's a life-or-death story'.

The Puerto Rican National Guard deliver food and water via helicopter to hurricane survivors as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

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