Apple iOS 11.3 brings power management to the people

Apple iOS 11.3 rolls out: Battery Health tool, new Animoji, and more

Apple releases iOS 11.3 with iPhone battery tool, new Animoji

Furthermore, the company is working on the next big update - iOS 12, which will replace all iOS 11.3. iOS 12 will be released with the new features such as new emoji character along with the update that they have planned for 2019 where the quality and performance issues will be discussed.

Introduced as part of iOS 10.2.1 in January 2017, this "power management feature", as Apple calls it, was meant to ensure that aging batteries could keep up with newer mobile OSes and to avoid crashes.

Video is the obvious next step in the evolution of Apple's music streaming service. Most notably, you'll now be able to check the health of your iPhone's battery, and you'll be able to see if your device is being throttled because of it.

Finally, iOS 11.3 also allows for some fun, new augmented reality experiences.

Enough has already been written about the iPhone's battery throttling saga from late a year ago, but iOS 11.3 brings the topic back up in that it fulfills Apple's previous promise of providing users with more information on the health of their iPhone's battery, as well as offering the ability to disable throttling altogether. After installing the update, head over to Settings Battery Battery Health to see if the slowdown feature is enabled on your iPhone 6, 6 Plus, SE, 6s, 6s Plus, 7, or 7 Plus. The company expects that developers will use ARKit to create experiences like interactive movie posters and museums filled with dynamic virtual exhibits.

The hub, a new Music Videos section in the browse tab, was first previewed as an iOS 11.3 feature back in January.

If you've been mourning the loss of MTV's near-constant influx of music videos, you're in luck: Apple Music now puts music videos front and center. It's available over the air and it's the first ever update for Apple's smart speaker. But the service is now only available in beta, and user who want it will have to install that version of the software.

One of the major fallouts from Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal is that everyone is now suddenly aware of just how much data Facebook and similar apps and sites collect about you.

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