It's not over: What just happened with net neutrality?

It's not over: What just happened with net neutrality?

It's not over: What just happened with net neutrality?

The resolution faces an uphill struggle in the Republican majority House and it would also need a signature from President Trump, who supports the repeal.

The FCC's existing net neutrality rules are set to end June 11 after the commission voted to gut the rules previous year.

But most Republicans opposed the effort, saying the regulations were potentially too onerous and that Democrats were trying to use the issue for partisan gains in November. "It will allow internet service providers and cable companies to dictate the winners and losers in the digital world and it will give a very small number of market players near-limitless power, stifling the rights of citizens that can not afford to play by their rules". "And it will continue to be free and open once the Restoring Internet Freedom Order takes effect on June 11", he asserted. Three Republican senators voted with Democrats: Sen.

It has been a insane year for Net Neutrality. That wouldn't necessarily weigh heavily on Congress, but with mid-terms fast approaching, some many be concerned that the issue will be a factor in how people vote.

The United States Senate today voted to nullify the FCC's rollback on net neutrality, unfortunately, it was a symbolic victory unlikely to affect the new rules to come into play next month that have the potential to adversely affect every facet of internet use. Angus King of Maine and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, as well as three Republicans - Susan Collins of Maine, John Kennedy of Louisiana and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska.

Net neutrality requires internet service providers (ISPs) like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon to give their users equal access to all internet content. Upending these rules means that, for a fee, ISPs can prioritize certain websites, allowing them to load more quickly on their users' devices, and slow down or even block other sites. Rosenworcel said: "Today's vote is a sign that the fight for internet freedom is far from over". Democrats think the fight to restore the rules could be a political victor during November's congressional midterm elections even if the effort is unsuccessful, as it will force Republicans to record a vote against reinstating the rules.

Markey said net neutrality has worked for the smallest voices and the largest, but he said internet service providers are trying to change the rules to benefit their interests.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Wednesday that the solution was for lawmakers to draft Net neutrality legislation "that would safeguard consumers but still prevent regulators from stifling innovation".

Even if the resolution fails, many states, including California and NY, are doing all they can to fight back against the FCC's decision with their own net neutrality proposals.

Information for this article was contributed by Frank E. Lockwood of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

Latest News