Judge in trial of Donald Trump's former aide says he received threats

Manafort jury asks judge to define 'reasonable doubt' during deliberations

Manafort jury asks judge to define'reasonable doubt during deliberations More

The case is the first to go to trial stemming from Mueller's investigation into Russia's role in the 2016 USA election, although the charges largely predate Manafort's five months working on Trump's campaign, including three as chairman.

Speaking to reporters on Friday in the White House lawn, Trump called the whole trial "sad". Judge Ellis read the note aloud to court - which asked to leave at 5pm instead of 5.30pm.

They are to continue deliberating on Friday.

The judge presiding over the fraud trial of Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, revealed on Friday that he has received threats and is under police protection. Jury lists are considered to be public unless a judge bans any access to them.

Before wrapping up their first day of deliberations on Thursday in Alexandria, the jury sent the judge a note with four questions, including one about the law on disclosing foreign bank accounts and another seeking a definition for "reasonable doubt".

Judge T.S. Ellis revealed Friday that he has faced "criticism and threats" as he oversees the first trial in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russian Federation investigation.

Judge T.S. Ellis, speaking in court while jurors deliberated for a second day, said he had received threats over the case and is being protected by USA marshals.

He will also not release the names of jurors at the trial's conclusion because he fears for their safety.

Manafort is charged with bank fraud, tax evasion and failure to report foreign bank accounts. Ellis said he would allow lawyers for the media outlets to argue the motion on Friday afternoon. Jury deliberations are set to resume Monday morning.

The jury had three other questions for the judge Thursday before they recessed for the day, including one requesting that they be given a document that matched the prosecution's evidence exhibits to the relevant charges.

The jury has begun its second day of deliberations in the tax and bank fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

Judge T.S. Ellis - the federal judge overseeing Manafort's case in Alexandria, Virginia, clarified to jurors that the government is not required to find "guilt beyond all possible doubt", but defined reasonable doubt as a "doubt based on reason". Then, when they Ukrainian money dried up, they say he lied on loan applications to maintain his cash flow.

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