JD.Com CEO Detained in United States for Sexual Misconduct

JD.Com CEO Detained in United States for Sexual Misconduct

JD.Com CEO Detained in United States for Sexual Misconduct

A sheriff's jail roster record from Minnesota's Hennepin County showed a man surnamed Liu with the given name of Qiangdong, the Chinese name for Richard Liu, was detained on suspicion of criminal sexual conduct on August 31 at 11:32 p.m.

A Chinese e-commerce giant says its billionaire founder, Liu Qiangdong, has returned to China after earlier being arrested in the US on suspicion of criminal sexual conduct.

The complaint against Liu was made just before midnight local time on Friday, and he was released just after 4 p.m. on Saturday, according to the Hennepin County Sheriff website.

Police spokesman John Elder told the Wall Street Journal, that law enforcement is "confident" that they will be able to reach the Chinese national "as the time becomes necessary." .

JD.com is China's second-largest e-commerce company after Alibaba. The #MeToo movement that has highlighted sexual misconduct has derailed the careers of well known entertainers, corporate executives and politicians in the United States and other countries, and has begun to find traction in China too.

Liu, who also goes by the name, "Richard Liu", is registered as a student in the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management doctor of business administration China program, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported. The students were in the Twin Cities last week as part of their training.

University spokeswoman Emma Bauer referred questions to the Minneapolis Police Department.

Longwei Xu was found guilty in July of sexual assault after a jury found that he pinned the woman down and repeatedly tried to have sex with her during an hour-long ordeal at his hotel room in December 2015, Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Legal troubles for Liu could darken perceptions overall of JD.com, whose shares trade on the Nasdaq stock market in NY and have a market value of around US$50 billion.

JD.com is 10 percent owned by Walmart, while Chinese internet firm Tencent owns 18 percent. While Liu was not accused of wrongdoing, he asked an Australian court to block release of his name, citing potential harm to his company and marriage.

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