Jimmy Kimmel Mocks Donald Trump’s Swearing-In Ceremony Of Brett Kavanaugh

Brett Kavanaugh Donald Trump

Jimmy Kimmel Mocks Donald Trump’s Swearing-In Ceremony Of Brett Kavanaugh

As he has been doing often recently on the campaign trail, Trump singled out specific Democrats for scorn - including Sens.

Heading into the November midterms, the GOP is defending its House and Senate majorities.

Murkowski already had touched upon the divisive nature of the Kavanaugh issue, saying that, "And I hope, I hope and I pray that we don't find ourselves in this situation again".

Murkowski, who isn't up for re-election until 2022, tells reporters that her "barometer is not necessarily what the president says but what the people of Alaska say".

"I can just see it just from traveling around the country in the last few days, traveling around Wisconsin, the Republican base is definitely animated after this", Ryan said.

In a letter Wednesday to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, Roberts said he had selected the court in Colorado to "accept the transfer and to exercise the powers of a judicial council with respect to the identified complaints and any pending or new complaints relating to the same subject matter".

CNN legal analyst Joan Biskupic said Brett Kavanaugh would be "changing the law of the land" for the next 20 years as the newest Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. Garland had been nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama, but Senate Republicans never acted on the nomination.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says it's not his job to police President Donald Trump's Twitter habits or his divisive rhetoric at campaign rallies and elsewhere.

His nomination had appeared safe until Ford last month went public with allegations that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in 1982 when they were high school students in Maryland.

US Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in at the White House. "I will continue to advocate for policies that stabilize our health-care markets, lower premiums and drug costs, and defend key consumer protections in the Affordable Care Act for people with pre-existing conditions". Fifty-six percent are angry about how the Senate treated Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, including 35 percent who are very angry, Rasmussen said.

Murkowski bucked her party and voted against advancing Kavanaugh's nomination. Republicans slammed Clinton for her statement, especially as it came after Republicans were "shot, stabbed, doxxed, beaten, mailed powder, run out of restaurants, and sent death threats", in the age of the Trump administration.

"In just four weeks you will have the chance to render your verdict on the Democrats' outrageous conduct", he said, urging people repeatedly to get out and vote, or mail their ballots in early.

But the sentiment in that arena is not shared by all, judging by an MSNBC poll which showed that 50 per cent of Americans disapproved of Justice Kavanaugh.

Latest News