Federal Judge Orders Georgia's Brian Kemp to Unblock Thousands From Voting

Pence Knocks Abrams Over Celebrity Support 'This Ain't Hollywood This Is Georgia'

'I approve this message': Oprah makes rare political appearance in support of Georgian candidate

Abrams, a graduate of Yale Law School, was the minority leader in the Georgia State House of Representatives and is in a closely fought race against Georgia GOP Secretary of State Brian Kemp to succeed Republican Gov. Nathan Deal.

The office of the Secretary of State said that the investigation started Saturday evening, and they told federal agencies like the Department of Homeland Security and Federal Bureau of Investigation about it.

The top two candidates each have a favorable rating of 46 percent, while their unfavorable number is also even at 42 percent.

Oprah Winfrey made it clear when she was in Georgia on Thursday to campaign for gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams that she was not there to lay the groundwork for a presidential bid of her own.

"He's wrong", Abrams said on CNN's "State of the Union".

She is the first black female nominee for governor from a major party.

Abigail Collazo, Abrams' director of strategic communications, condemned the robocall and said both Trump and Kemp have contributed to a poisonous atmosphere, adding that Kemp has responded with silence on previous racial attacks on Abrams.

Abrams, who is polling nearly neck-and-neck with Kemp, told CNN that she had been unaware of her opponent's investigation into her party.

The catchphrase was a reference to an episode of Oprah's talk show, in which the media mogul gifted audience members with a vehicle, announcing, "You get a auto! We defer to the State for further details". President Trump will appear with Kemp on Sunday.

Polling in the race is extremely close, most analysts rating the outcome a toss-up. Vice President Mike Pence stumped for Kemp on Thursday, and criticized the star power Abrams' campaign has attracted.

Over 50,000 voters in Georgia have been flagged as ineligible, due to errors with their voter registration information.

"Democracy is not just about our individual rights and concerns and our individual protections", Winfrey said, "but rather it lives and thrives in making sure that everybody is lifted by the community".

In response to a lawsuit brought by civil rights groups, a judge on Friday ruled the state unfairly burdens about 3,100 possible voters whose registration was flagged for citizenship issues.

The ruling from U.S. District Judge Eleanor Ross is a "minor change" to the current system, said Candice Broce, a spokeswoman for Kemp, in a statement.

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