Sensitive internal Facebook documents published by UK Parliament

Credit Bloomberg

Credit Bloomberg

-Facebook "whitelisted" certain companies, meaning that they still had full access to users' friends data after platform changes in 2014/15, including Airbnb, Netflix, and Badoo. According to Bloomberg, the California courts sealed the emails, but the United Kingdom compelled the Six4Three founder to hand over a laptop containing the emails, which were acquired during discovery, when the founder visited London. However, Facebook claims that it only used that information "to do things like make better suggestions for people to call in Messenger and rank contact lists in Messenger and Facebook Lite". "Sometimes the best way to enable people to share something is to have a developer build a special objective app or network for that type of content and to make that app social by having Facebook plug into it". "This change meant that a lot of sketchy apps-like the quiz app that sold data to Cambridge Analytica could no longer operate on our platform", he wrote.

Internal Facebook documents, previously seized by Britain, confirm that the tech giant made a habit of sharing user data with other firms without user consent and tried to avoid bad publicity by obfuscating its data vacuuming.

Stifel analysts on Wednesday lowered their rating on Facebook shares to "hold", saying that "political and regulatory blowback seems like it may lead to restrictions on how Facebook operates, over time". MP Damian Collins, who chairs Parliament's Digital, Culture Media and Sports Committee, said the probe established several key issues.

The cache was seized in November as part of a fake news enquiry and have now been published on the parliament website.

Facebook defended its practices in a statement.

Though filed under seal and redacted in the lawsuit, Collins said the material needed to be made public because "they raise important questions about how Facebook treats users' data, their policies for working with app developers, and how they exercise their dominant position in the social media market".

Zuckerberg's response, according to the email, was to "go for it".

Facebook's staff also discuss "exploring a path" where call log information was requested without asking permission from the phone's owner.

A January 2013 email in the documents from Justin Osofsky, currently Facebook's vice president for global operations and media partnerships, notes that Twitter had just launched Vine, its now-discontinued short-video service, which was allowing their users to find friends via Facebook. The company limited app developer access to lists of friends, other than those also using the same app, in most cases, according to the statement.

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