Brexit in numbers: How did parliament vote on Monday?

Johnson says May's Brexit deal is 'dead'

Brexit in numbers: How did parliament vote on Monday?

On Monday, May conceded she did not yet have sufficient support in parliament to bring the deal back for a third vote, but said she still hoped to do so this week and was continuing to speak to lawmakers.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has said her twice-defeated Brexit deal still lacked support in Parliament but that she hopes to eventually secure enough votes to get the deal approved.

That March 15 statement also noted the government believes the best way forward is for Britain to leave the European Union "in an orderly manner" with a deal, and that parliament had rejected leaving without an agreement.

"This amendment instead upends the balance between our democratic institutions and sets a risky, unpredictable precedent for the future".

"Brexit is like the Death Star of politics", Conservative legislator George Freeman said.

May's statement on Monday came after she fought off a half-formed attempt to oust her. Sterling fell as the chances of May's deal passing slipped. May said she would "engage constructively" with the results of the process, though she said she was skeptical that it would produce a decisive result.

"This House must also consider whether any deal should be put to the people for a confirmatory vote", he told parliament after the votes.

Amid talk of a Cabinet coup against her and hundreds of thousands of people marching to demand a second referendum - as well as a petition to cancel Brexit altogether reaching five million signatures - the Prime Minister would be forgiven for wanting to relinquish some control.

She warned MPs that if they did not accept her Brexit deal, and continued to insist that no deal was unacceptable, then a longer extension to Article 50 was likely, keeping the United Kingdom in the EU beyond European elections in May.

Following last week's delay to the country's March 29 scheduled departure - which MPs must still vote into law this week - the way forward remains highly unpredictable. The prospect of a softer Brexit would also increase pressure on the Brexit-supporting lawmakers in her own party to get behind her deal.

British lawmakers on Monday voted in favor of an amendment which would lead to a series of indicative votes on Wednesday on "alternative ways forward" on Brexit. May's Brexit deal with the EU.

Speaker John Bercow will announce at the start of the debate, around 1530 GMT, if he has selected any amendments to be voted on.

Probably not - because were she to do so there would probably be mass resignations of remainy ministers.

"I think we will see today that there is a mood in the House of Commons to stop us leaving without a deal, even if that means no Brexit".

MPs are trying to force May's government to change its approach through a series of parliamentary votes created to identify what deal if any could the find majority support that May's plan has not. However, if the vote fails, MPs will have until April 12 to either devise a new Brexit deal or to decide to leave without a deal.

The four amendments that were taken off the table included another no-deal block, a pro-Brexit amendment and a call for a second referendum by the Independent Group and the Liberal Democrats.

The Brexiteers are in a minority, but form a powerful bloc in May's Conservative Party.

That March 15 statement also noted the government believes the best way forward is for Britain to leave the European Union "in an orderly manner" with a deal, and that parliament had rejected leaving without an agreement.

Opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn attacked the government, branding May's approach over Brexit as a "national embarrassment".

The EU's executive Commission said Monday that it had finished planning for a no-deal Brexit, which could occur on April 12.

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