Jury Awards $29.4 Million in Talcum-Cancer Trial

Jury Awards $29.4 Million in Talcum-Cancer Trial

Jury Awards $29.4 Million in Talcum-Cancer Trial

Johnson & Johnson had refuted allegations that the product causes cancer and cited several studies and tests that to prove that its talc is safe.

Johnson & Johnson is facing some 13,000 similar lawsuits around the country.

The jury, in the California Superior Court in Oakland, awarded Leavitt and her husband $29.4 million in damages. The jury decided against awarding punitive damages, which are created to punish the defendants - in this case Johnson & Johnson and the other companies involved in making the talcum powder - for reckless or negligent behavior.

A woman who said her mesothelioma was caused by her regular use of Johnson & Johnson's talcum powder was awarded $24.4 million by a California jury, which also awarded $5 million to her spouse. This suit is the first to go to trial since December articles by Reuters and The New York Times alleged the company feared for years that its baby powder might contain asbestos.

'We respect the legal process and reiterate that jury verdicts are not medical, scientific or regulatory conclusions about a product, ' J&J said in a statement on Wednesday.

A woman in California who says Johnson & Johnson baby powder caused her to develop mesothelioma was awarded $29 million by a jury Wednesday.

Asbestos is found insulation, roofing and some plastics, but according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), the naturally occurring minerals also turn up in the pure form of talc, which is the basis for talcum powder like that used in Johnson & Johnson's products. "The internal J&J documents that the jury saw, once more laid bare the shocking truth of decades of cover-up, deception and concealment by J&J".

There were serious procedural and evidentiary errors in the proceeding that required us to move for mistrial on eight different points during the proceeding.

The company has appealed against all of the plaintiff verdicts, and the company said it was confident the verdicts would be overturned on appeal. Cypress Mines, one of J&J's former talc suppliers, is answerable for the remaining 2 percent.

In response to the lawsuit, Johnson & Johnson released a statement about the verdict, saying the company plans to appeal.

The investigations followed a Reuters report that claimed that J&J knew about the presence of asbestos traces in its products for the last 50 years and failed to disclose this to national regulators and customers.

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