MPs across the south east react to Brexit defeat

Sorry we haven’t a clue Brexit mired in crisis again			
				 
   by Dominic Yeatman 
  Published

Sorry we haven’t a clue Brexit mired in crisis again by Dominic Yeatman Published

Theresa May's Brexit strategy has been left in tatters after MPs rejected her Brexit deal for a second time on Tuesday, by a majority of 149.

May told Bone this was not realistic: "The EU have made it clear there will be no agreement without a withdrawal agreement, and that includes what we have already negotiated on citizens' rights, a financial settlement and a Northern Ireland protocol".

It comes after the Labour leader called for no deal to be "taken off the table" following the defeat of Prime Minister Theresa May's plan last night.

If the Commons declines to approve a no-deal Brexit a vote on extending Article 50, the legal mechanism taking the United Kingdom out of the European Union on March 29, will take place on Thursday, said Mrs May.

Shadow business secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey told BBC News Parliament would increasingly "set the agenda" if the government was not in control of events.

And Mr Western, the Labour MP for Warwick and Leamington, has told his constituents he will be voting later today to take the option of a "no deal" Brexit off the table.

"The prime minister has run down the clock and the clock has been run out on her", the 69-year-old leader said in the House of Commons.

Conservative MP John Baron then pushed Mrs May to back a no-deal Brexit, arguing "no deal is better than a bad deal".

Free votes on issues of national significance are rare.

Pleas ignored Mrs May begs for support and vote result announced
Pleas ignored Mrs May begs for support and vote result announced

Labour has also said it won't vote for May's deal, as Jeremy Corbyn accused the government of trying to "fool" its own backbenchers - and the British people.

Under the no deal plan revealed this morning, 87 per cent of products would be subject to zero tariffs in an effort to stop price spikes and kick-start trade with Britain from across the world.

The EU has said it would need "a credible justification" before agreeing to any extension. Just three Labour MPs backed the deal.

The government also announced it will not introduce any new checks or controls, or require customs declarations for any goods moving from across the border from Ireland to Northern Ireland if the United Kingdom leaves the European Union without a deal.

A delay to the March 29 departure date is now nearly certain.

"We owe it to the country to provide them with a government that can govern", he said.

The EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, has said the current impasse "can only be solved in the UK" and MPs must decide what they want rather than what they don't.

The prime minister added: "We can not serve our country by overturning a democratic decision of the British people".

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