Burnout is an official medical diagnosis, World Health Organization says

World Health Organization now recognizes “Gaming Disorder” as an official illness By Mitch Reames

World Health Organization now recognizes “Gaming Disorder” as an official illness By Mitch Reames

The ICD, along with the American Physchiatric Association's (APA) DSM-5 and other medical diagnostic manuals for physical and mental health conditions and disorders are given considerable weight in the medical profession and new conditions aren't just thrown in willy-nilly.

The six main risk factors for work burnout are having an overwhelming workload, limited control, unrewarding work, unfair work, work that conflicts with values and a lack of community in the workplace. Given the sometimes isolating nature of video games, early intervention is essential in many cases as prevention is the best treatment for addiction disorders.

South Korean game companies reacted angrily yesterday to the World Health Organisation's (WHO) decision to officially recognise gaming disorder as a disease.

Being hooked on gaming is now officially a disorder. "Those are going to take a while to dismantle, but now more than ever, that's what makes this really urgent".

It is defined by World Health Organization as manifested by impaired control over gaming, increased priority is given to gaming, continuation despite negative consequences.

While ICD-11 is being celebrated by many as a step in the right direction, activists are keen to highlight that there is still work to be done.

Today, the gaming industry is one of the biggest verticals in the entertainment sector, a multi-billion dollar industry.

Response from the video games industry remained negative throughout. Gaming is increasingly taking the place of older social media platforms, cutting into time people spend on Facebook or Snapchat.

This is not the first time the ICD has changed a classification related to sexuality. The Entertainment Software Association, which represents video game makers in the US, said that a gaming disorder designation "recklessly trivializes real mental health issues".

The term the World Health Organization uses to describe transgender people - "gender incongruence" - is being moved to the panel's sexual health chapter from its mental disorders chapter, the WHO's legislative body has voted.

WHO's expert on mental health and substance abuse, Shekhar Saxena, told NBC News these addictions can take precedent overeating and sleeping, causing some to log over 20 hours on their computers or consoles. He called the new diagnosis "sorely needed". Gaming addiction has been studied on numerous occasions and it's become a growing concern, especially with the evolution of gaming.

To all gamers out there, do you think that you are suffering from gaming disorder?

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