MPs Reject Labour Attempt To Block No-Deal Brexit

John Bercow

ALLOWED Speaker John Bercow had sparked anger by allowing Labour to table the motion

Angry Labour MPs have since rounded on their few colleagues who voted against the motion.

"But in all circumstances we do have to leave the European Union and move on so we can start talking about some of the wonderful future that lies ahead of us". Others are arguing that Parliament doesn't have the power to force a prime minister to change course. It has to be respected by whomsoever will be the next prime minister.

Speaking in the Commons, Snell said ceramics firms asked him "time and time again" to back a deal so they could make preparations for the future while food manufacturers wanted him to make a decision so they could "get past stockpiling".

He attacked politicians who played down the risks of a no-deal Brexit through misleading language, adding: "No deal is not "clean", the mitigations announced so far are temporary, incomplete and untested with industry, and we would then have to enter into talks with the European Union all over again".

Edwin Morgan, Interim Director General of the Institute of Directors, said: "This week's vote won't be the last twist in the Brexit saga, but it made clear how real the possibility of no deal is". Only legislating to revoke the Article 50 exit notification would stop Brexit happening.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer has said Labour will use its opposition time on Wednesday to try to give control of Parliament's agenda to MPs on June 25. If it had passed, it would have given MPs the opportunity to table legislation with a view to stopping no deal.

While there is little precedent for this, parliamentary rules have proven flexible in recent months and speaker John Bercow, who wields considerable influence over procedural matters, has been supportive of attempts to block no deal.

"Any Tory leadership candidate should know that parliament will continue to fight against no-deal". That has provoked widespread criticism from all parties, including rival leadership candidates. This would require some Conservatives, or the allied Democratic Unionist Party, to rebel. "On that theme, the Conservative party leadership contest kicks off with its first ballot tomorrow, where a hard Brexit-supporting candidate is likely to emerge victorious at the end of the process".

In a statement on preparations for Britain's departure, Brussels said it would not enter talks on future trade until London honours "the financial obligations the United Kingdom has made as a member state". The ballot takes place in a Houses of Parliament committee room between 10am (0900 GMT) and 12pm (1100 GMT), with the results expected to be announced around an hour later.

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